2007
04.07

Comment on The decisive Hamlet by Sariel Har-Peled

Quasi mathematicians – I hate these bastards.

2007
04.07

Comment on The decisive Hamlet by JS

I confess myself utterly unable to appreciate that celebrated soliloquy in Hamlet, beginning ‘To be or not to be,’ or to tell whether it be good, bad, or indifferent, it has been so handled and pawed about by declamatory boys and men, and torn so inhumanly from its living place and principle of continuity in the play, till it is become to me a perfect dead member.
Charles Lamb, On the Tragedies of Shakespeare, in Selected Prose, Penguin, London. 1985. p. 47.

Declamatory boys and men include quasi-mathematicians.

2007
04.07

Comment on The decisive Hamlet by Sariel Har-Peled

Cliff’s notes did not mention any of these people. Which version did you read?

And what about Rosenkrantz and Gilderstein? Their only crime was delivering orders blindly, without even knowing what the orders have been.

Well, even the original Hamlet was not a saint, but being decisive would not have helped but made things even worst.

Of course, one can claim that Ophelia killed herself, and all the other characters were in collaborations with the new king. And Hamlet was insane towards the end, since he stopped taking his medication. Once one has to defend something, one can mount the most idiotic defense.

2007
04.07

Comment: “The decisive Hamlet”

New comment on your post #494 “The decisive Hamlet”
Author : Sariel Har-Peled
Comment:
Cliff’s notes did not mention any of these people. Which version did you read?

And what about Rosenkrantz and Gilderstein? Their only crime was delivering orders blindly, without even knowing what the orders have been.

Well, even the original Hamlet was not a saint, but being decisive would not have helped but made things even worst.

Of course, one can claim that Ophelia killed herself, and all the other characters were in collaborations with the new king. And Hamlet was insane towards the end, since he stopped taking his medication. Once one has to defend something, one can mount the most idiotic defense.

2007
04.07

Comment on The decisive Hamlet by mrc

…but what about Ophelia? isn’t Indecisive Hamlet (IH) responsible for her suicide, in a way? and how about Polonius — or is reckless manslaughter ok?

2007
04.07

Comment on The decisive Hamlet by JS

Rapid deletion means Freud could have been right.

2007
04.07

The decisive Hamlet

Hamlet (of the to be or not to be fame) is usually criticized for his indecisiveness. He is the ultimate flip-flopper that can not make up his mind, and end up killing everybody (including himself).

But let us consider the alternative **decisive Hamlet** – he sees the vision of his father telling him that his mother conspired with the current king to kill him, and he immediately goes and kill them both.

One advantage of the decisive Hamlet is that the play would have been much shorter, a thing that generations of students would have been thankful for. But if you consider the moral ground that the Decisive Hamlet stands on, one would realize that it is a swamp. Indeed, motivated by a delusion he goes and kill his mother and the current king. One might consider such a person to be delusional, murderer and insane. Definitely not a moral person.

And this is where the original Hamlet wins – he dies a moral person. It is not clear that the Decisive Hamlet would have survived in the long run, living under the cloud of his own morality, as judged by himself and the world around him.

That does not imply that the Original Hamlet is to be admired. Certainly, there are infinite alternative Hamlets in between the Original and the Decisive Hamlets, and maybe one of them could have done much better. But the original Hamlet get trusted into a terrible situation, gets the original criminals punished, and dies with his morality intact. Maybe still a loser, but a respectable loser at that.

The real tragedy might be the failure to accept that there is no winning strategy to the situation that Hamlet is in. No victory is possible. A problem without an acceptable solution.